Maple Syrup - a Canadian Staple

Tastes of Toronto’s Culinary Mosaic

In Food Tripping, Toronto by Daryl & Mindi Hirsch4 Comments

Like most large cities around the world, the city of Toronto is a mosaic comprised of many cultures and ethnicities.  This diversity brings much to the city’s vitality, especially as respects the food options.  While in Toronto this month, we made a point to visit several neighborhoods that create the mosaic.

Our first stop was for dim sum in Chinatown (see our previous post).  This thriving neighborhood in the center of the city bustles with activity and shopping.

Vibrant Chinatown Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Vibrant Chinatown

Chinatown Shoppers Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Chinatown Shoppers

Next time we’re in Toronto, we want to try some other Chinatown delicacies such as the Hong Kong style meats hanging in the windows.

Hong Kong Style Meats Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Hong Kong Style Meats

Not to mention the eclectic produce selection.

Rambutan Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Rambutan

Of course we went to Little Italy. We tried both savory and sweet foods while there.

Enoteca Sociale Appetizer Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Enoteca Sociale Appetizer

Enjoying a Cannoli at Little Italy's Riviera Bakery Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Enjoying a Cannoli at Little Italy’s Riviera Bakery

Koreatown is another happening neighborhood. While there, we took a beverage break.

Drinks from a Koreatown Grocery Store Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Drinks from a Koreatown Grocery Store

Little India is a bit more off the beaten track. While there, we made a food pit stop.

Tandoori Chicken at Little India's Bar-Be-Que Hut Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Tandoori Chicken at Little India’s Bar-Be-Que Hut

Unlike Toronto’s colorful, eclectic Kensington Market, the St. Lawrence Market is enclosed in two buildings.  The south building has lots of food shops and casual eateries.  The north building hosts a weekly farmer’s market each Saturday.   The St. Lawrence Market is old, dating back to 1803, and has lots of interesting local foods. There’s plenty of pea-meal bacon – Toronto’s unique contribution to the global pork spectrum.

Peameal (a/k/a Canadian Bacon) Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Peameal (a/k/a Canadian Bacon)

We tried this Toronto staple on a sandwich at the Carousel Bakery.

Carousel Bakery - Home of the Famous Peameal Bacon on a Bun Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Carousel Bakery – Home of the Famous Peameal Bacon on a Bun

Carousel Bakery's Peameal Bacon on A Bun Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Carousel Bakery’s Peameal Bacon on A Bun

Biting into a Peameal Bacon Sandwich Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Biting into a Peameal Bacon Sandwich

We walked around the market and visually feasted on the many options.

Pastel de Natas - Portugal Treats in Canada Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Pastel de Natas – Portugal Treats in Canada

Brioche Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Brioche

One of Many Cheese Shops Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

One of Many Cheese Shops

Big Bones Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Big Bones

Colorful Food Bar Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Colorful Food Bar

Pile of Prosciutto Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Pile of Prosciutto

Crocodile Meat - Just One Example of the Different Game Options Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Crocodile Meat – Just One Example of the Different Game Options

Maple Candy Toronto Canada cultural mosaic

Maple Candy

The market is a fun culinary spot in Toronto. It has been ranked as tops in the world by National Geographic and CNN Travel, which is kind of wrong when you think about market gems such as Barcelona’s La Boqueria, London’s Borough Market and Tokyo’s Tsukiji Fish Market (see our previous posts about two of these markets).  Planning note – the St. Lawrence Market is closed on Sundays and Mondays.

All in all, we recommend that you check out the different neighborhoods and markets when you visit Toronto. Are these neighborhoods as exciting as Chinatown in Flushing, NY or Koreatown in Los Angeles? Probably not.  But touring them is a good way to survey Toronto’s food culture and a great way to see the diverse city.


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Comments

    1. Author

      We first fell in love with Pastel de Natas in Lisbon. We have since had them in Montreal, Toronto, Kyoto and Macau. They’re always good, but best in Lisbon.

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