Window by Louis Comfort Tiffany, circa 1905

The Corning Museum of Glass – More Than Just Casseroles

In Food Tripping, Northeast by Daryl & Mindi Hirsch6 Comments

We visited The Corning Museum of Glass after a weekend of drinking and eating with friends in the Finger Lakes. As we entered the museum, we read:  “Glass is different things to different people. At The Corning Museum of Glass, you will discover the many things glass can be.” During our visit, we discovered art, history and science through glass. We even found beauty through glass.

The Corning Museum of Glass

The Corning Museum of Glass

Corning Museum of Glass

The museum has an extensive collection of glass that spans 3,500 years. Mandy Kritzeck, Content & Media Specialist, gave us a personal tour and made sure that we saw the highlights. We started the tour by checking out the contemporary section. We were drawn to the whimsical art made by Ginny Ruffner and the fiber glass bowls made by Toots Zynsky.

Contemporary Art at The Corning Museum of Glass

Contemporary Art at The Corning Museum of Glass

The most photographed piece in the contemporary section, if not the entire museum, is the chess set made by Gianni Toso, a Venetian artist, in 1981. The chess set is quite unique with Jewish and Catholic religious figures standing in for the normal kings and knights. The crosses and torahs add to the fascinating board game’s religious theme.

Chess Set by Gianni Toso, circa 1981 at The Corning Museum of Glass

Chess Set by Gianni Toso, circa 1981 at The Corning Museum of Glass

The museum’s historical collections provide glimpses into past civilizations including Egypt, Rome, and Islam. The pieced-together black hemispherical bowl with inlaid nihilistic scene from Rome, circa 4th – 5th century A.D., is a true treasure in terms of both art and history.

Cool Historic Pieces at The Corning Museum of Glass

Cool Historic Pieces at The Corning Museum of Glass

There are lots of interesting collections from bowls to vases to furniture. We were drawn to the snuff bottle collection with its Asian flair.

Snuff Bottles at The Corning Museum of Glass

Snuff Bottles at The Corning Museum of Glass

Portraits are always interesting, especially when they span the centuries.

Glass Portraits, Old and New, at The Corning Museum of Glass

Glass Portraits, Old and New, at The Corning Museum of Glass

One of the museum’s highlights is the Louis Comfort Tiffany window. Designed for an estate in Irvington-on-Hudson, the window reminded us of the Dream Garden at the Curtis Building in Philadelphia.

Window by Louis Comfort Tiffany, circa 1905, at The Corning Museum of Glass

Window by Louis Comfort Tiffany, circa 1905, at The Corning Museum of Glass

During our walk through the Innovation Center, we learned how glass is used from the mundane (casseroles) to the electronic (cell phones) to the exotic (space ships). It was interesting to hear how Corning invents products before their uses are fully realized, which is what happened with the glass that is now used for computer screens. The interactive exhibits are perfect for kids of all ages, including big kids like us.

Innovation Center at The Corning Museum of Glass

Innovation Center at The Corning Museum of Glass

As we checked out the many scientific applications for glass, it was good to get a reminder of where much of the Corning legend began. It’s not every day that you can see a giant tower of casseroles.

Corning Casserole Tower at The Corning Museum of Glass

Corning Casserole Tower at The Corning Museum of Glass

After viewing the various and vast collections, it was fun to take a break to watch glass actually get made. The hot glass show featured two gaffers, i.e. master glassmakers, making a decorative vase. These master glassmakers made the vase in a 2300 degree furnace. Interestingly, the video camera inside the furnace was developed for use in the space industry.

Hot Glass Show

Hot Glass Show

Once we saw glass get made, it was time for the 2foodtrippers to try our hands at making glass ourselves. Kurt Carlson guided us through the process of selecting colors and creating glass flowers from scratch. Since the flowers needed to cool overnight, the museum mailed the flowers to us in Philadelphia.

Making Glass Flowers at The Corning Museum of Glass

Making Glass Flowers at The Corning Museum of Glass

Lunch in Corning

It wouldn’t be a 2foodtrippers outing without food. Conveniently, it was a short walk to Corning’s historic district.

Downtown Corning

Downtown Corning

Although there were a few cute bakeries, we opted to eat lunch at Holmes Plate. The burger and chili hit the spot. We were disappointed that the Ommegang Game of Thrones keg was kicked, but we happily settled for a glass of Great Lakes Tripel Dog Dare to share instead.

Lunch at Holmes Plate in Corning, NY

Lunch at Holmes Plate in Corning, NY

Holmes Plate is located at 54 W Market St, Corning, NY 14830, United States.

As we strolled along Market Street, we enjoyed a scoop of maple walnut ice cream from Dippity Do Dahs. Made on site with local ingredients, the ice cream was a tasty treat.

Ice Cream at Dippity Do Dahs in Corning, NY

Ice Cream at Dippity Do Dahs in Corning, NY

Dippity Do Dahs is located at 58 E Market St, Corning, NY 14830, United States.

After lunch, we headed back to the museum to finish our tour. We ended our visit with a walk through the colorful gift shop with glass items from local and global artists and companies.

Gift Shop at The Corning Museum of Art

Gift Shop at The Corning Museum of Art

Three hours at the museum was not enough considering the quantity and quality of the exhibits, and we will surely return when we next visit the Finger Lakes. If we make glass flowers again, hopefully they’ll look better then the two that we made on this first visit. Then again, it surely takes years of practice to be a real glass artisan like those featured at the Corning Museum of Glass.

Glass Flowers Made by 2foodtrppers

Glass Flowers Made by 2foodtrppers

The Corning Museum of Glass is open seven days a week.  Admission is free for kids and teens, and it’s reasonably priced for adults.  Check out the museum’s website for full details and discounts.

We thank the Corning Museum of Glass for providing us with complimentary entry and a private tour to facilitate this article.

The Corning Museum of Glass is located at 1 Museum Way, Corning, NY, 14830, United States.


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Comments

  1. I love glass because it starts as something so simple and turns into beautiful pieces of art. For beginners your flowers look amazing by the way 🙂
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